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Old 10-08-2016, 03:10 PM   #1
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What are you listening to now?

Sibelius, the beautiful Andante Festivo - a good tempo here, generally it is taken too fast, but this is more in keeping with the composer's own 1939 recording.

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Old 10-10-2016, 02:33 AM   #2
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Mahler, symphony 7, Levine
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Old 10-10-2016, 07:56 PM   #3
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Thanks for sharing that, Peter! I don't think I've heard this before and the tempo does sound good to me, as well.
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Old 10-11-2016, 11:05 AM   #4
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I've just been watching this recital from the 2014 Verbier Festival. "The Triff" with Kavakos playing Schumann et. al. A wonderful performance from two superlative musicians: I hadn't heard the Busoni before!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lhy2m6x_qeA

An American friend I met up with in Vienna last year emailed me this July that she was back in Vienna and was about to see Daniil Trifonov at the Musikverein. A couple of hours before the performance she wandered into Cafe Schwarzenberg (across the road from the Imperial Hotel, right near the Musikverein) and who should be in there drinking coffee and eating chocolate cake but Trifonov!! She went up and spoke to him and found him relaxed and friendly - right before a major recital.

http://www.cafe-schwarzenberg.at/en/index.html
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Old 10-13-2016, 05:40 PM   #5
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Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.
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Old 10-13-2016, 06:39 PM   #6
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Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.
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Old 10-13-2016, 09:39 PM   #7
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Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.
Dylan has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature!! I love many of his songs and "The Hurricane" stands out in my memory as the one time I was able to have the lowest Year 9 English class succeed in Poetry!! This song spoke to them in their own language - and musically it's absolutely compelling, with its rhythmic and harmonic ostinato and the appearance of riff-like embellishments:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGMSfiH850o

And its still-contemporary subject matter continues to ensure Dylan's music remains 'relevant'.
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Old 10-14-2016, 03:33 AM   #8
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Mahler sympony 1, Muti.
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Old 10-16-2016, 04:35 AM   #9
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Watching "Der Rosenkavalier" - the 1979 version with the great man Kleiber conducting. I can cast it to my (Loewe) television with Google Chrome Cast and then I get to see the glorious visage of Kleiber on an even bigger screen and get far better sound quality!! It's a tremendous production and Brigitte Fassbaender is in fine form. How I love this opera:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXsT...=RDTWKqAALQztw
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Old 10-16-2016, 02:16 PM   #10
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Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.
Don't need to put on a recording. Dylan is embedded in my soul.
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Old 10-18-2016, 01:41 PM   #11
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The Haydn Trumpet Concerto, played by Wynton Marsalis, in celebration of his 55th birthday.
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Old 10-18-2016, 03:10 PM   #12
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The Haydn Trumpet Concerto, played by Wynton Marsalis, in celebration of his 55th birthday.
I thought Haydn was much older than that!
Anyway, I'm listening to Beethoven's variations on Righini's "Venni Amore".
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Old 10-18-2016, 04:20 PM   #13
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Sibelius Pohjola's daughter
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:22 PM   #14
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Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.
Seems they awarded him the Nobel prize for literature recently but he has yet to respond.
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Old 10-19-2016, 10:20 AM   #15
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Watching Kleiber in action again!! This time the Wiener Philharmoniker Neujahrskonzert 1992 and the "Gypsy Baron Overture". He's in fine form and with loads of energy - but looking very much his 61 years. This concert is poignant for a couple of reasons; firstly, because Carlos is gone and, secondly, because the Concertmaster, Gerhart Hetzel, immediately to the left of Carlos, was killed just a few short months after this in a hiking accident in Salzburg. This shook the orchestra to its core!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIv2Ltf2cD4
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Old 10-19-2016, 05:39 PM   #16
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Arnold Bax's symphonic poen 'Tintagel' which though his best known orchestral work, is still not widely known and should be!

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Old 10-19-2016, 06:39 PM   #17
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Arnold Bax's symphonic poen 'Tintagel' which though his best known orchestral work, is still not widely known and should be!

Very nice, Peter, thank you.
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Old 10-19-2016, 07:17 PM   #18
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Arnold Bax's symphonic poen 'Tintagel' which though his best known orchestral work, is still not widely known and should be!
It must be this piece which was used in the opening of a Goon Show I heard many, many years ago:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFrm0HewFuw
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Old 10-20-2016, 04:05 AM   #19
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Currently listening to:

Stephen Kovacevich playing Brahms Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel. This is a staggering work and from Variation 25, starting at 20'53", the work is unmitigated ecstasy!! Fireworks, earthquakes, colliding stars....and I'm such a wreck when it's finished!! And it's great to be able to read the music if you want to listen via U-Tube; brushing up on that sight-reading:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9tbCkACbGU

I'd have to say Kovacevich is my favourite living pianist; I've loved his work since hearing him practice for a recital when he was known as Stephen Bishop.
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Old 10-20-2016, 05:57 AM   #20
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Currently listening to:

Stephen Kovacevich playing Brahms Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel. This is a staggering work and from Variation 25, starting at 20'53", the work is unmitigated ecstasy!! Fireworks, earthquakes, colliding stars....and I'm such a wreck when it's finished!! And it's great to be able to read the music if you want to listen via U-Tube; brushing up on that sight-reading:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9tbCkACbGU

I'd have to say Kovacevich is my favourite living pianist; I've loved his work since hearing him practice for a recital when he was known as Stephen Bishop.
Yes a wonderful piece and even Wagner admired the fugue! Thanks for posting that as it takes me back to my 'A' level music because this was one of the set pieces.
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Old 10-20-2016, 06:46 AM   #21
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Yes a wonderful piece and even Wagner admired the fugue! Thanks for posting that as it takes me back to my 'A' level music because this was one of the set pieces.
"..one of the set pieces". You mean, back in the day when there was rigour and standards that demanded something of music students? I'm extremely impressed that you managed this, let alone in high school. My mother attained her Licenciate in Piano at 18 - but that was 1944!!

My friend who co-ordinates our music group with me studied for a time at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest and has been a music pedagogue and practicing musician. We have the most depressing conversations about the exponentially declining 'standards' in music schools today. I set out the problems on an earlier posting, but I also think a lot of bright students who are musical are going into STEM subjects and entering those professions. This is where the employment offers more stability and greater income. A niece of mine was a fine pianist and she studied International Law and works for the government. There are plenty of such examples; in short, there must be a lot of very good amateur musicians out there.

Last edited by Humoresque; 10-20-2016 at 06:50 AM. Reason: I spy....something beginning with 'S'
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Old 10-23-2016, 01:08 AM   #22
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I am listening to all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas. Currently on #26.
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Old 10-23-2016, 06:46 AM   #23
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I am listening to all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas. Currently on #26.
Who's playing?
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Old 10-24-2016, 12:07 PM   #24
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Who's playing?
A mixed bag (and it looks like I missed a couple of the sonatas in this list):
Mikulas Skuta 1,2,6, 13, 15, 16, 20, 22
Svjatoslav Richter 3, 7, 19
Daniela Ruso 4, 14, 24, 25, 27-32
Mario-Ratko Delorko 5
Dubravka Tomsic 13, 21, 23
Hugo Steurer 11, 12
Sylvia Capova 17, 26
Steven Beck 9
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Old 10-24-2016, 01:30 PM   #25
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Ligeti: Requiem
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Old 10-25-2016, 12:39 AM   #26
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Right now I'm listening to and watching this magnificent production of "L'Orfeo" with Jordi Savall conducting. Montserrat Figueris was absolutely fabulous in this repertoire and her singing of the Prologue here is perfection; her elegant vibrato is delicately interspersed with the stylized ornamentation of the period and produces a warm and nuanced performance: I've got this connected up to my hi-fi and the magic is palpable!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ma4OelX45I
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Old 10-25-2016, 06:28 AM   #27
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Right now I'm listening to and watching this magnificent production of "L'Orfeo" with Jordi Savall conducting. Montserrat Figueris was absolutely fabulous in this repertoire and her singing of the Prologue here is perfection; her elegant vibrato is delicately interspersed with the stylized ornamentation of the period and produces a warm and nuanced performance: I've got this connected up to my hi-fi and the magic is palpable!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ma4OelX45I
Yes I've seen this production before - magnificent! By the way Jordi Savall recorded a version of the Eroica that is faithful to the first private Lobkowitz performance of the Eroica in terms of the forces employed and it makes for a very interesting contrast to the norm. Of course Beethoven himself had a larger orchestra for the first public performance.
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Old 10-25-2016, 07:38 AM   #28
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Well I'll most definitely check out Jordi's Beethoven. It's probably somewhere on U-Tube.

The other day I talked about music standards in schools etc. and I mentioned my own mother who achieved her LMusA in piano, saying this was 1944. Well, today I contacted the AMEB and their archivist sent me a scanned document to show that she was, in fact, one of only 10 people in the state of NSW in 1943 to achieve this (some people would have been away at war too, presumably). At that time she was either late 16 or early 17. Today she'd still be at school and finding out this information at this time has been very emotional for me.
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Old 10-25-2016, 06:03 PM   #29
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Bach's Goldberg Variations by Glenn Gould 1981. One of the true masterpieces of humanity.
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Old 10-26-2016, 08:02 AM   #30
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Brahms symphonies 1 and 3 - Karajan.
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Old 10-26-2016, 03:32 PM   #31
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Bach's Goldberg Variations by Glenn Gould 1981. One of the true masterpieces of humanity.
True! I have been listening to some Bach played by Gould myself lately.
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Old 10-26-2016, 11:03 PM   #32
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Mahler 7. Bernstein's earlier cycle.
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Old 10-27-2016, 06:08 AM   #33
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This miracle of a piano sonata A Major, D664, from the one and only Schubert. What's absolutely not to love? Today I was able to have an in-depth discussion about this wonderful sonata, and Schubert generally, with a friend from our music group who feels the same way I do.

"Bright star! would I were steadfast as though art" (Keats)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGg5dVoNB6c

Is there, seriously, anything better in life than listening to this music, reading about it and then being able to discuss it with another knowledgeable enthusiast? I mean, this has got to be right up there!!!
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Old 10-27-2016, 07:04 AM   #34
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This miracle of a piano sonata A Major, D664, from the one and only Schubert. What's absolutely not to love? Today I was able to have an in-depth discussion about this wonderful sonata, and Schubert generally, with a friend from our music group who feels the same way I do.

"Bright star! would I were steadfast as though art" (Keats)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGg5dVoNB6c

Is there, seriously, anything better in life than listening to this music, reading about it and then being able to discuss it with another knowledgeable enthusiast? I mean, this has got to be right up there!!!
It is a lovely piece just brimming with life and joy.
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Old 10-29-2016, 01:25 AM   #35
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Boris Godunov highlights disk while I wait for my CD set of the complete opera in both the 1869 and 1872 versions to arrive.
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Old 10-29-2016, 07:22 AM   #36
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Sibelius symphony no.2 - Watch the timpani player at 44'06 for some terrific playing!
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Old 10-30-2016, 12:53 AM   #37
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Love and Respect 101:

Watch the end of this Wiener Neujahrskonzert 1992 - at 1Hr 28' 45" - the orchestra refuses to stand for the cheering audience, despite a cue from Kleiber to do so; instead they are wanting to also acknowledge the great Kleiber!! Very touching, especially when they all stand up for him!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7Hn0do-xKE

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Old 10-30-2016, 09:18 PM   #38
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Liszt "Wienen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen" for organ. This is a dark, somewhat gothic piece which Liszt composed after the death of his daughter Blandine. But its final section is an exultant evocation to the God in whom Liszt so fervently believed. Out of the darkness, light!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Tduh7-4Hc

I've been reading an essay about Liszt written by Schoenberg in his "Style and Idea: Selected Writings" where the Austrian describes Liszt as essentially a composer motivated by faith who "fell into error" with regard to music. Schoenberg wasn't impressed with Liszt's music but his essay becomes more philosophical than analytical and doesn't convince for a second. This is a problem I've encountered before when reading what musicians and composers say about music - they become philosophical and tend to waffle. Twenty or more years ago I might have felt inclined to 'believe' what they had to say; today I am far more skeptical and critical.

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Old 10-31-2016, 05:43 AM   #39
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Sibelius symphony no.2 - Watch the timpani player at 44'06 for some terrific playing!
This is a very beguiling symphony; I've been working my way through the Sibelius symphonies since my comments about Brahms and his drop-dead gorgeous 4 symphonies which, AFAIC, put an end to the symphonic form. You argued that Sibelius was a great exponent of the symphony and mentioned his final one in particular - which, I understand, was not described as a symphony by the composer.

But, for me, all these symphonies by Sibelius are a joy but very different to the Brahms symphonies which were of a rigorous classical style. I feel that the symphony as a genre was never better than those 4 by Brahms any time afterwards. And Sibelius was a nationalist and this programmatic element is very strong in his symphonic works. So, I'll modify my original comments by suggesting that though wonderful symphonies were written after Brahms had completed his 4 (and the Viennese didn't take too kindly to some of them either, according to Jan Swafford), these in no way matched those by Brahms.

And musical genres change their forms and idioms. For example, the keyboard sonatas of Scarlatti bear little resemblance to the sonatas of Haydn, Mozart or Beethoven. Yet they are all still all regarded as "sonatas".

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Old 10-31-2016, 07:09 AM   #40
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This is a very beguiling symphony; I've been working my way through the Sibelius symphonies since my comments about Brahms and his drop-dead gorgeous 4 symphonies which, AFAIC, put an end to the symphonic form. You argued that Sibelius was a great exponent of the symphony and mentioned his final one in particular - which, I understand, was not described as a symphony by the composer.

But, for me, all these symphonies by Sibelius are a joy but very different to the Brahms symphonies which were of a rigorous classical style. I feel that the symphony as a genre was never better than those 4 by Brahms any time afterwards. And Sibelius was a nationalist and this programmatic element is very strong in his symphonic works. So, I'll modify my original comments by suggesting that though wonderful symphonies were written after Brahms had completed his 4 (and the Viennese didn't take too kindly to some of them either, according to Jan Swafford), these in no way matched those by Brahms.

And musical genres change their forms and idioms. For example, the keyboard sonatas of Scarlatti bear little resemblance to the sonatas of Haydn, Mozart or Beethoven. Yet they are all still all regarded as "sonatas".
Whilst admiring the Brahms symphonies I can't share your assessment - we might as well say that after Beethoven nothing can compare which is indeed how the next generation felt. The main criticism of Brahms was that he was still using classical forms in a Romantic era. Bruckner I think took the symphony further by taking Beethoven's 9th as the starting point.

Listening to Bruckner's underrated 6th Symphony / Wolfgang Sawallisch.
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